When Californians Dumped the Diversity Dogma

Lloyd Billingsley
Policy Fellow with the Independent Institute (Independent.org) based in Oakland, CA

On November 5, 1996, California voters approved Proposition 209, the California Civil Rights Initiative, by a margin of 54 to 46 percent. Twenty years later this vote should be recalled as a victory over racial prejudice and politically correct dogma. According to this dogma, all institutions should precisely reflect the racial or ethnic diversity of […]

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A Surge Against Proposition 13

Lloyd Billingsley
Policy Fellow with the Independent Institute (Independent.org) based in Oakland, CA

In June of 1978 California governor Jerry Brown opposed Proposition 13, but voters passed the measure in a landslide. California’s ruling class has never ceased to attack it, and these attacks are certain to escalate with new ammunition from Nathan Gardels of the Berggruen Institute. “The Proposition 13 property tax revolt of 1978 still defines […]

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New State Report Busts Proposition 63

Lloyd Billingsley
Policy Fellow with the Independent Institute (Independent.org) based in Oakland, CA

Promises Still to Keep: A Decade of the Mental Health Services Act, a new report by the Little Hoover Commission, notes that Proposition 63 raised a whopping $13.2 billion. But according to the report, the state is unable to document whether the $13.2 billion fulfilled any of the Act’s proclaimed intentions. According to sponsor Senator […]

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California’s cover story

Lloyd Billingsley
Policy Fellow with the Independent Institute (Independent.org) based in Oakland, CA

The
following op-ed appeared in the
San Francisco Examiner on May
15, 2011:

Last month The Economist, prestigious British journal, ran a cover story: "Where
it all went wrong: A special report on California’s dysfunctional democracy."
The report blames "direct democracy," the initiative process, for the state’s
woes. The ruling class loves the report, but Californians have good reason to
be wary.

The initiative process lets ordinary
Californians become policymakers. For example, in 1996, the first time they had
any say in the matter, Californians passed Proposition 209, which ended racial,
ethnic and gender preferences in state government, employment and contracting.
That policy of institutional discrimination had been imposed by legislators and
unelected bureaucrats.

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