Legal but Still Poor: The Economic Consequences of Amnesty

Joel Kotkin
Editor of NewGeography.com and Presidential fellow in urban futures at Chapman University

With his questionably Constitutional move to protect America’s vast undocumented population, President Obama has provided at least five million immigrants, and likely many more, with new hope for the future. But at the same time, his economic policies, and those of the progressive wing of the Democratic Party, may guarantee that many of these newly […]

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The Progressives’ War on Suburbia

Joel Kotkin
Editor of NewGeography.com and Presidential fellow in urban futures at Chapman University

You are a political party, and you want to secure the electoral majority. But what happens, as is occurring to the Democrats, when the damned electorate that just won’t live the way—in dense cities and apartments—that you have deemed is best for them? This gap between party ideology and demographic reality has led to a disconnect […]

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The Demographics That Sank The Democrats In The Midterm Elections

Joel Kotkin
Editor of NewGeography.com and Presidential fellow in urban futures at Chapman University

Over the past five years, the Democratic Party has tried to add class warfare to its pre-existing focus on racial and gender grievances, and environmental angst. Shortly after his re-election in 2012, President Obama claimed to have “one mandate . . . to help middle-class families and families that are working hard to try to get into the middle class.” Yet despite […]

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Trustafarians Want to Tell You How to Live

Joel Kotkin
Editor of NewGeography.com and Presidential fellow in urban futures at Chapman University

Americans have always prided themselves on being a nation of the self-made, where class and the accident of birth did not determine success. Yet increasingly we are changing into a society where lineage does matter—and likely this process has just started, threatening not only our future prosperity but the very nature of our society. In […]

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Silicon Valley’s Chips Off the Old Block

Joel Kotkin
Editor of NewGeography.com and Presidential fellow in urban futures at Chapman University

Silicon Valley long has been hailed as an exemplar of the American culture of opportunity, openness and entrepreneurship. Increasingly, however, the tech community is morphing into a ruling class with the potential for assuming unprecedented power over both our personal and political lives. Rather than the plucky entrepreneurs of legend, America’s rising tech oligarchy constitutes […]

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California Bad to its Bones

Joel Kotkin
Editor of NewGeography.com and Presidential fellow in urban futures at Chapman University

Any serious student of California knows that the state’s emergence in the past century reflected a triumph of engineering. From the water systems, the dredged harbors, the power stations and the freeway system, California overcame geographical limits of water, power and its often-unmanageable coastline to create a beacon of growth and opportunity. That was then, […]

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Battle of the Upstarts: Houston vs. San Francisco Bay

Joel Kotkin
Editor of NewGeography.com and Presidential fellow in urban futures at Chapman University

“Human happiness,” the Greek historian Herodotus once observed, “does not abide long in one place.” In its 240 years or so of existence, the United States has experienced similar ebbs and flows, with Boston replaced as the nation’s commercial capital first by Philadelphia and then by New York. The 19th century saw the rise of […]

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Why Suburbia Irks Some Conservatives

Joel Kotkin
Editor of NewGeography.com and Presidential fellow in urban futures at Chapman University

For generations, politicians of both parties – dating back at least to Republican Herbert Hoover and Democrat Franklin Roosevelt – generally supported the notion of suburban growth and the expansion of homeownership. “A nation of homeowners,” Franklin Roosevelt believed, “of people who own a real share in their land, is unconquerable.” Support for suburban growth, […]

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Southern California Becoming Less Family-Friendly

Joel Kotkin
Editor of NewGeography.com and Presidential fellow in urban futures at Chapman University

The British Talmudic scholar Abraham Cohen noted that, throughout history, children were thought of as “a precious loan from God to be guarded with loving and fateful care.” Yet, increasingly and, particularly, here in Southern California, we are rejecting this loan, and abandoning our role as parents. This, of course, is a process seen around […]

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Class Issues, Not Race, Will Likely Seal the Next Election

Joel Kotkin
Editor of NewGeography.com and Presidential fellow in urban futures at Chapman University

Recent events in Ferguson, Missouri and along the U.S.-Mexico border may seem to suggest that race has returned as the signature issue in American politics. We can see this already in the pages of mainstream media, with increased calls for reparations for African-Americans, and expanded amnesties for the undocumented. Increasingly, any opposition to Obama’s policies is […]

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